Need Quick Hurricane Flood Damage Inspections? | EMA (321) 355-6052
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Need Quick Hurricane Flood Damage Inspections

EMA engineers provide quick Hurricane flood damage inspections in Fort Myers, Sarasota, Winter Haven, North Port, Orlando, & Daytona each, Ormond Beach, Melbourne, Sebastian and surrounding areas. We protect ourself and our clients from the unique challenges posed by flood damaged inspections of damaged buildings.

Hazards in and around hurricane IAN flood damage inspections of  buildings include the risks of:

  • growth of large mold colonies;
  • septic system collapse;
  • trip-and-fall injuries;
  • structural collapse;
  • fire and explosions;
  • toxic sludge and materials containing waterborne bacteria; and
  • electrical shock hazards.

Do you Need Quick Flood Damage Inspections? Call EMA Engineers

  • Inspect the building flood damage inspections for exterior of all type of buildings. Gas leaks will smell like rotten eggs. If you suspect a gas leak, contact the utility company immediately.
  • If you need quick hurricane flood damage inspections in Fort Myers area, While entering the building, see if the door sticks at the top. If it does, this could mean that the ceiling is ready to collapse. After you open the door, stand outside the doorway, clear of any falling debris.
  • Wear sturdy, treaded boots. According to the American Red Cross, the most common injury following a disaster is cut feet. Broken bottles, nails, glass, and other dangerous debris may litter the floor, and stairs may be very slippery.
  • Once you are inside the home, check for gas leaks again by flood damage inspections. If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and quickly leave the building. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve, if you can, and call the gas company from a neighbor’s home. If you turn off the gas for any reason, a professional must turn it back on. Never use an open flame inside of a flood-damaged house unless you know that the gas has been turned off and the house is ventilated. To inspect for damage, use a battery-powered lantern or flashlight, and not an open flame or electrical fixture in the house.
  • Florida Flood damage Inspections

  • Examine doors, walls, windows, floors and staircases to make sure that the flood damage inspections of  building shows no signs of potential collapse. Inspect for loose plaster, drywall, and ceilings that may fall. Also, inspect the foundation for evidence of cracks and other structural damage that may render the building uninhabitable.
  • Inspect for fire hazards, such as broken and leaking gas lines, flood damage inspections electrical circuits, and submerged furnaces and electrical appliances. Flammable and explosive materials may travel from upstream. Be aware that fire is the most frequent hazard in homes following floods.
  • Inspect for electrical system damage, such as broken and frayed wires, and burned insulation. You can turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. If you have to step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker, call an electrician first for advice. Electrical equipment should be inspected by a qualified professional and dried before being returned to service.
  • Inspect for sewage and water supply-line damage. If you suspect sewage lines during flood damage inspections have been damaged, avoid using the toilets and instruct the client to call a plumber before using flood damage inspections. If water pipes are damaged, instruct the client to contact the water utility company and avoid operating the tap.
  • Use caution while inspecting crawlspaces for a variety of reasons, such as the presence of mold, sewage, asbestos, chemicals, rodents, and the risk of structural collapse.

Florida awoke Thursday to destruction and desperation.

A monster-sized Hurricane Ian pummeled the state on Wednesday with crushing storm surge, obliterating wind speeds and torrential rainfall, leaving a swath of devastation from the southwestern coast across the I-4 corridor.

Hurricane IAN, the fifth-most powerful to ever hit the U.S., left countless homes and businesses wrecked or underwater and nearly 2.7 million people without power.

‘Fort Myers Beach is gone’: Waterfront workers recount Hurricane Ian devastation

Less than 24 hours after Ian made landfall near Cayo Costa just west of Fort Myers, dramatic search-and-rescue efforts — some by helicopters and airboats — were still underway.

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